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Summer Jobs: What to know about minor work permits – The Tribune

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Summer Jobs: What to know about minor work permits

Published 12:00 am Monday, April 22, 2024

COLUMBUS — With just 10 weeks until the beginning of summer, many Ohio teens will soon be completing employment applications for summer jobs.

For those under the age of 18, the Ohio Department of Commerce Division of Industrial Compliance’s Bureau of Wage and Hour reminds them they may also need a minor work permits before they clock in on their first day.

Ohio teens between the ages of 14-17 are required to have a Minor work permit to hold a job during the school year.

During the summer, only those under the age of 16 need a work permit. Permits are not required for anyone over the age of 18, or for those who have graduated from high school, regardless of their age.

The Bureau of Wage and Hour provides oversight for minor work permits, which are issued by a student’s school district.

Minor work permit applications can be downloaded here and should be completed by the minor’s parents and prospective employer.

Once completed, those applications should be submitted to the student’s school, which will issue the permit.

“Our role in enforcement, especially as it relates to minor labor, is to encourage teens to secure jobs, work hard and learn as much as they can,” Bureau of Wage and Hour chief Steve Clegg said. “We believe the real-life experience teens get from their first job is extremely valuable and helps to lay the groundwork for successful, steady and rewarding employment into the future.”

There are some restrictions that impact different age groups regarding the hours they can work during certain times of the year.

• Ages 14-15: During the school year, 14- and 15-year-olds are not permitted to work more than 18 hours a week and cannot work past 7 p.m. on days that precede a school day. When school is not in session, such as during summer, spring and holiday breaks, those individuals are not permitted to work past 9 p.m. and cannot work for more than 40 hours in a week.

• Ages 16-17: There are not any hour restrictions for 16- and 17-year-olds when school is not in session; however, during the school year, individuals in this group cannot work past 11 p.m. on a day that precedes a school day.

The state’s break requirement, which includes a 30-minute break after five consecutive hours of work, applies to both age groups any time of year.

A common misconception about minor work permits is that teens must have them in-hand before they can apply for a job.

However, because a description of the job and work duties is needed to complete the application process, a teen must already have a job offer before applying for a minor work permit.

In the event that a teen has more than one job during summer break, they must have obtained a minor work permit for each job they’ve secured.

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